A gifted individual is a quick and clever thinker, who is able to deal with complex matters. Autonomous, curious and passionate. A sensitive and emotionally rich person, living intensely. He or she enjoys being creative. -definition of giftedness written by the Netherlands Study on Giftedness in Adults

Monday, October 20, 2014

Gifted Kids Become Gifted Adults

When a gifted kid grows up, they are still gifted.


That means we have a lot of gifted adults out there - parents, grandparents, young adults, elderly adults. And while we may learn to cope with our over-excitabilities, they don't go away. And I'm pretty convinced that asynchrony doesn't ever fully even out, either (see the former sentence).

I, like my son, have all five OEs. Very strongly. And I am a multipotentialite, which means I am gifted in many ways. I have said to people, "I'm good at many things, but great at nothing." Over the years, I've also told people that I'm a generalist, rather than a specialist, though as I get older I find that I do have some areas of preference to which I naturally migrate.

With my own OEs, I find that I continually have to monitor how I am coping. I get overwhelmed easily with a lot of sensory input, so I must manage my environment. I love learning new things, so I tend to jump from interest to interest quickly, making the work of completing tasks and staying engaged a challenge. Movement is my friend, helping me think more clearly and stay focused. My imagination has morphed from childhood fantasies to turning my interpretation of events into a reality of its own, which isn't a healthy response, so I try to adjust my imagination to more positive uses.

And then there is emotional OE. After all these years, you'd think I would learn. But yet, here I am, still emotional as anything. I can't go to a funeral without crying, even if I never knew the deceased - the weight of everyone's emotions in the room gets overwhelming. I have to intentionally tone down the reactive nature of my emotional OE, but if someone catches me off guard, it slips. It's all or nothing with me emotionally, it seems, though I work hard to keep it all balanced and in check.

And, as I mentioned before. I'm pretty sure that my own asynchrony - though far better than it was as a child - is still a factor. There are times I can see myself responding like a four year old and can't stop it. Most of the time, it's an internal-only reaction (that's the adult part), but I mess up regularly enough to keep me humble. There are times when my hands - so adept and quick at certain tasks like typing or playing the piano - feel like they are fumbling along completely inept at simple things like using scissors or a needle. I'm still a child in an adult body.

People ask me how I can understand my son so well. The reason is because I recognize what is going on with him, because it would be the same for me. It still is the same for me, though I have more control over my environment and how I express what's going on inside of me.

I might have grown up, but I'm still gifted.

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This post is part of a blog hop hosted by the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum. To read more great blogs on this topic, see hop on over to the link here.



11 comments:

  1. I <3 the pictures :-)
    And yes, it's my own experience that helps me understand my own kids and their needs.

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  2. Thanks Mona. Love your photos.

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  3. "I might have grown up, but I'm still gifted." -- T-SHIRTS PLEASE!

    Love this post. And the photo. Can't stop lovin' the photo, girl.

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  4. I had never considered that asynchrony stays with us into adulthood. It would explain many of my SMH moments. :) Wonderful, honest post!

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  5. The getting easily overwhelmed? Oh yes. Oh my dear, yes. I too cry easily - I cry at all the sad parts of movies - even if it's a terrible movie and I know it - I just can't help but mirror the emotions on screen. It's only very recently that I've realised I don't need to be ashamed of my OE - and that's mostly to help my kids see that expressing their own OEs is not a bad thing.

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  6. Love the last line. I completely agree - all those OEs are still alive and well in me. :-)

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  7. Such an honest, open post about your giftedness as an adult. I loved every bit of it. Thank you, Mona!

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  8. This is a beautiful post. I loved this:
    People ask me how I can understand my son so well. The reason is because I recognize what is going on with him, because it would be the same for me. It still is the same for me, though I have more control over my environment and how I express what's going on inside of me.

    I might have grown up, but I'm still gifted.

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  9. I am able to help my son with his emotional OEs because I learned to recognize the signs in my self before becoming full blown Anxiety Attacks. Of course I learned this through a year of therapy as an adult so I hope that by helping him recognize the signs and set up coping strategies when he is young that he will have fewer blow ups then I did and have greater overall health & happiness in his lifetime. My family preferred to called me gifted, but too sensitive. Sometimes, he is now helping me realize when I am becoming overwhelmed. Thanks for sharing!

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  10. Articulate, honest, and insightful writing, Mona. Thank you for sharing.

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